From 1905 to 1932 during the zoo years at Manito this area was covered with decorative hedges and paths to different areas of the zoo. Reports list animal cages along the wall to the current Rose Garden. With the records that are available, it is…

This hidden and beautiful park sits just off Riverside Drive under the shadow of a railroad trestle. This park was once home to several Native Americans including Chief Spokan Garry. Native Americans lived in this park off and on well into the…

Palisades Park starts high above Spokane and includes about 700 acres. The cross streets are Greenwood Rd. and Rimrock Drive. The park is considered both conservation land and a city park and includes views of the city and Mount Spokane, basalt…

This trail constructed along an abandoned railroad line was part of the old Spokane and Inland Empire Railroad Company. This passenger line transported people within Spokane as well recreational areas like Liberty, Hayden, and Coeur d'Alene…

Aubrey L. White is the known as the father of Spokane's Parks. He arrived in Spokane in 1889 and spent a lot of time mapping, marking, and noting the incredible views and features in the Spokane area. He was instrumental in bringing the famous…

Grant Park sits in the newly revitalized Perry Street District on the lower South Hill. This park is unique in that it was originally designed to be a playfield, originally called the U. S. Grant Playground. It was 2.97 acres and like many of the…

High Bridge Park has had a variety of uses including a motor camp, sanitarium for tuberculosis, temporary home to a steam locomotive, federal housing for veterans, a potential zoo site, a dude ranch offer, a dump, and currently it is home to a dog…

Polly Judd was an enthusiastic supporter of Spokane Parks and was active in the community. According to her obituary on March 30, 1981 in the Spokane Daily Chronicle, she was one of the founders of the Lilac Festival, served on the board of the…

Underhill park started as Underhill Playfield. Unlike many of the other early parks in Spokane, which were meant to be landscaped gardens of peace and contemplation, this park was designed to have ball fields and play equipment. It was purchased in…

When Edgar J. Webster came to Spokane in 1883 he planned to practice law. He built his summer home on the outskirts of the growing city of Spokane in a place called Minnehaha. The stone building still stands in the park today. While rumors about…

The breathtaking views ago High Drive are the highlight of Spokane's system of scenic roadways. The system was laid out a century ago and is described in the Park Board Report of 1913, "High Drive Parkway is a picturesque driveway lying on the…

The land where Riverside State Park sits was once lands used by the Spokane Tribe and other local tribes. The Native Americans would meet at the Spokane Falls or near the confluence of the Little Spokane and the Spokane Rivers to trade or to set up…

Seventh Avenue and the lower South Hill was once the neighborhood of Spokane elites. Bankers, senators, businessmen, mining and lumber entrepreneurs, doctors, architects, and lawyers built their mansions along the base of the basalt bluff. Some…

Standing at 2260 feet above sea level, this volcanic outcrop was used by the Spokane Tribe as a lookout. On a clear day you can see as far as the Little Spokane River and Mount Spokane. The park was formed in 1908 and included only 4.2 acres. …

According to a long time Spokane resident, the City of Spokane had a reputation of "being a little on the wild side when it came to the proverbial wine, women, and song." By the early 19th Century, city fathers were engaged in an effort to drive the…

While Mount Spokane was never officially a Spokane Park, the Spokane Parks department helped take care of it and was concerned with its future. Previously known as Mount Baldy and Mount Carlton, Mount Spokane got its name in 1912. Spokane…

This camp site along Hangman creek in High Bridge park was a tourist destination from the early 1920s until the 1950s. Featured in the December 1946 trailer topics magazine, Westward Ho, the article praises Spokane for its reasonable rates ($4.50 a…

This small park between West Sixth and Seventh Avenue off Division is nestled in the South Hill Medical Complex. This area was where the Spokane Indians established their winter quarters but when Reverend Henry T. Cowley arrived with his family in…

The main entrance to Manito Park is now at 18th and Grand, but in earlier years the entrance was at 20th and Grand. While today the area is green with grass and shaded by a few trees, in the first years of the twentieth century the "See Spokane…

Decline of the old Liberty Park began in the 1950s when the Spokane Park Board decided to fill in the pond for health reasons. In 1952 the city decided to dump nonburnable waste into the depression left by the pond and finally in 1956 plans for the…

Before the Japanese Gardens, this area was part of the zoo from 1905 to 1932. This area was home to ostrich and emu. The Japanese Garden was designed by Nagao Sakurai. He designed 166 gardens all over the world. The idea for a Japanese Garden…

Before entering the Japanese Gardens, face northwest and you will see the Spokane Sister City sign at the corner of Bernard and Shoshone Place. The Sister City program idea started in the 1940s when a coastal city in Canada paired up with a…

Today a part of Grant Park, Stadacona Circle was one of the earliest parks in Spokane. Once located on Eleventh Avenue between Ivory and Arthur Streets, this small 1.3 acre park was donated to the City of Spokane by the Citizens' National Bank and…

Comstock Park is one of many philanthropic works in Spokane. By the 1930s, park design had different priorities, recreation rather than contemplation and an emphasis on youth activities. Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Shadle donated 21 acres and $150,000 to…

Nestled between two busy highways, the John A. Finch Arboretum is a quiet getaway from the hustle and bustle of Spokane. With only the hum of the highway to distract visitors, this 56 acre park boasts over 600 species of trees and shrubs. The…

Chief Garry Park is the principal place in the city where Chief Spokan Garry is remembered and honored. The park dates back to 1912 when seven acres of land were purchased and set aside as a neighborhood park. It was named Chief Garry park in 1932…

Once an Indian winter camp, this area where Hangman Creek (Latah Creek) and the Spokane River merge has been a popular site for campers, transients, and picnickers. According to Curly Jim, from the Spokane Tribe and early friend of the whites who…

In 1968, Natatorium closed. For some it would be the close of an era, for others, it was a long time coming. Though Natatorium was never owned by the Spokane Parks Department, it was a park many Spokane residents remember fondly. The park was…

The Zoo was part of Manito Park from 1905 to 1932. There were several small animal cages near Rose Hill and the rock gardens, which housed skunk, coyote, bobcat, and other animals. While the zoo was a popular attraction, its upkeep proved…

"Lemonade and garden hats" are the legacy of Corbin Park according to an article in the Spokane Daily Chronicle in 1973. This tranquil, oval shaped park nestled among some of the busiest roads in Spokane once belonged to the Washington-Idaho Fair…