The Alternate Uses of Fairmount Cemetery

On any given day, you will find that Fairmount Memorial Park is used for much more than the interment of the dead. Located at the end of a neighborhood drive, the Park is used for ... well, a park. In fact, historically, cemeteries were often a community's first parks where people would go to picnic and take strolls through the beautiful grounds.

While most cemeteries, today, are occasioned by people taking their dogs for walks, the grounds at Fairmount are used daily for recreational activities. People walk or jog laps along the paved driveways, and families ride their bicycles on them. Some parents use the parking lot by the Sunset Mausoleum to take off the training wheels of a child's bike and guide the young one to its new-found two-wheeled freedom. And, according to Sharon Evans (Fairmount's Secretary), people even snowshoe and go cross-country skiing in the winter time.

Not only do people engage in these activities inside the gates, they also make use of the undeveloped grounds to the north and east for the same kinds of recreation. Only here, there are dirt paths rather than paved ones.

So, if you're looking for a new place to work out or go for a peaceful stroll, check out your neighborhood cemetery.

Images

Park-Like Setting

Park-Like Setting

Fairmount Memorial Park Spokane, WA Photo Credit: Julie Y. Russell 2012 View File Details Page

Cycling Through Fairmount on Memorial Day

Cycling Through Fairmount on Memorial Day

Fairmount Memorial Park Spokane, WA Photo Credit: Julie Y. Russell 2012 View File Details Page

A Safe Place to Ride

A Safe Place to Ride

Photo Credit: Dreams Time Website Royalty Free Stock Photography View File Details Page

Trails at Fairmount

Trails at Fairmount

Undeveloped Property Fairmount Memorial Park Spokane, WA Photo Credit: Julie Y. Russell 2012 View File Details Page

Video

Park or Cemetery?

By Julie Russell View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Julie Y. Russell, “The Alternate Uses of Fairmount Cemetery,” Spokane Historical, accessed June 28, 2017, http://spokanehistorical.org/items/show/247.
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