Patrick Clark Mansion

Browne's Addition Tour - Story 8

Patrick "Patsy" Clark was an Irish immigrant who came to the United States in 1850.   Clark quickly left New York for the promise of mining opportunities in California.   Clark was wildly successful in his mining overseeing operations and worked in mines from California to Montana and seemingly everywhere in between before working at the Poorman and War Eagle mines in Idaho.   Clark became a well respected mine overseer and was even called upon for his expert opinion when mines were sold. In 1889 Clark proved his business sense by selling the War Eagle mine to a group of investors for nearly three quarters of a million dollars in cash.   When the new investors inspected their new mine, they found the ore was almost entirely exhausted and would have to begin searching for new reserves within the mine.

Clark settled in Spokane in 1889 when he commissioned renowned architect Kirtland Cutter to build him a home.   Clark told Cutter to spare no expense in the construction of his home.   Cutter finished the home in 1898, nine years after Clark commissioned the home.   The Clark Mansion stands as one of the most extravagant homes in the entire Northwest.

Kirtland Cutter spent years trying to create his vision of the Clark Mansion, even touring Europe to gain inspiration and craftsmen necessary to create this mansion.   Inside of the extravagant mansion each major room, such as the Foyer, Drawing Room and Dining Room, had a different architectural style.   In total the mansion has twenty-seven rooms excluding the attic and basement.   Furnishings inside of the mansion were custom built by artisans to Cutter's specifications.   The effect of the mixture of this one of a kind architecture and furnishings produced one of the most stunning homes in what became known as the age of Extravagance in Spokane.

The Clark Mansion has had a variety of uses since Patrick and his wife Mary Clark died in 1916 and 1926. For roughly the first fifty years after the Clarks passed on the Mansion was used as a private residence. The Mansion was then converted into the Francis Lester Inn, then into Patsy Clarks' Restaurant from 1982-2001. Today the 2nd and 3rd floors of the Mansion are used by the law firm of Eymann Allison Hunter Jones P.S., while the ground floor can be rented out for special events such as weddings.

Images

The Clark Mansion

The Clark Mansion

The Clark Mansion in the snow. Image courtesy of Zachary Wnek. View File Details Page

Tiffany Windows

Tiffany Windows

A photo of one of the stunning Tiffany stained glass windows in the Clark Mansion. Photo courtesy of Zachary Wnek. View File Details Page

Art

Art

An artistic rendering of the Clark Mansion entitled: 'Elegance From a Bygone Era' Image courtesy of Roger Lynn, Flickr Commons. View File Details Page

Clark Mansion

Clark Mansion

An undated image of the Clark Mansion. Image courtesy of Washington State Digital Archives. View File Details Page

Grandfather Clock

Grandfather Clock

A photo of the grandfather clock inside of the Clark Mansion. Photo courtesy of Zachary Wnek. View File Details Page

Dining Room

Dining Room

A photo of the dining room in the Clark Mansion. Photo courtesy of Zachary Wnek. View File Details Page

Audio

Community Historian Jim Price

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Community Historian Jim Price

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Cite this Page:

Zachary Wnek, “Patrick Clark Mansion,” Spokane Historical, accessed April 28, 2017, http://spokanehistorical.org/items/show/281.

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