Monroe Hall

By the middle of the nineteenth century the Cheney State Normal School continued to expand in spite of the disastrous fire. Only a year after Showalter Hall was built it was apparent that the increasing prominence of the Normal School and the town of Cheney required a dormitory. The building you are now facing is that dorm.

Called Monroe Hall this is the second oldest building erected on campus. It was completed in the fall of 1916 less than a year after Showalter Hall was completed. In its original form Monroe Hall was designed to hold 90 women and included a social lounge and a large dining room with a kitchen. Monroe Hall continued to be used as a dorm until is was turned into office facilities in 1968. A prominent addition to the exterior of the building was added as part of a renovation in 2000. The dorm was a much needed audition as the Cheney State Normal School was entering a new era of growth and development that would not be interrupted by fire.

Monroe Hall also represented the first time that a prominent faculty members had a building dedicated to them (Showalter Hall would not receive its name until 1940). Benjamin P. Cheney had the original academy named after him but he was a distant benefactor having only made two high profile appearances in the City of Cheney. Showalter Hall was named after Noah David Showalter who was installed as the ninth president of the Cheney State Normal School in 1911 and whose tenure lasted until 1926. Monroe Hall was named after Mary A. Monroe who came to the college in 1913 as a member of the board of trustees, the first woman to serve on the board.

Images

Monroe Hall pre-renovation

Monroe Hall pre-renovation

35 millimeter color image of Monroe Hall prior to its 2000 renovation. | Creator: Archives and Special Collections, Eastern Washington University Libraries View File Details Page

Showalter Hall Lobby (with Sacajawea Statue)

Showalter Hall Lobby (with Sacajawea Statue)

Color photo of the lobby of Showalter Hall today with the Statue of Scajawea that has long been a symbol of Eastern Washington University. | Creator: John Moudy View File Details Page

Cheney State Normal School Swimming Pool 1915

Cheney State Normal School Swimming Pool 1915

Black and white photo of what at the time was the Cheney State Normal School Swimming Pool located in Showalter Hall. | Creator: Archives and Special Collections, Eastern Washington University Libraries View File Details Page

Mary A. Monroe

Mary A. Monroe

Black and white photo of Mary A. Monroe first female member of the colleges board of trustees, and the person whom Monroe Hall is named after. | Creator: Archives and Special Collections, Eastern Washington University Libraries View File Details Page

Monroe Hall today (Main Stairwell)

Monroe Hall today (Main Stairwell)

Color photo of the main stairwell of Monroe Hall today. In spite of a renovation in 2000 the interior retains much of its original style. | Creator: John Moudy View File Details Page

Monroe Hall pre-renovation

Monroe Hall pre-renovation

Black and white photo of Monroe Hall prior to its 2000 renovation. | Creator: Archives and Special Collections, Eastern Washington University Libraries View File Details Page

Noah David Showalter 1925

Noah David Showalter 1925

Image of Noah David Showalter taken from the 1925 Kinnikinnick, the yearbook for Eastern Washington University. Showalter was an early president of the college and influential in its development. | Creator: Archives and Special Collections, Eastern Washington University Libraries View File Details Page

Audio

Early Struggle

Describes the early financial and political issues that nearly caused the Normal School's closure in the first decade it was open. | Creator: John Moudy View File Details Page

Monroe Hall

Describes the history of Monroe Hall from its construction to the present day and also includes some information of Mary A. Monroe, whom Monroe Hall is named after. | Creator: John Moudy View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

John Moudy, “Monroe Hall,” Spokane Historical, accessed July 28, 2017, http://spokanehistorical.org/items/show/50.
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