Developed by Carrie Harris, the Hotel Aberdeen is a corner-lot brick building that captures the stories of working-class Spokanites who came to Spokane at the turn of the 20th century to work in growing regional industries such as mining, lumber, and…

In the house that once sat on this corner of 1st and Hemlock lived Robert E Strahorn. Few men can be said to have as much influence developing the west as Strahorn. Throughout the 1870s and 80s, he traveled across the Pacific Northwest as the…

Before the Civil Right Movements in the 1960s, Jim Crow was the law of the land. Spokane was not exempt from racial segregation. Black Spokanites were restricted to the few restaurants, nightclubs, and hotels that were willing to serve them. Even…

When the United States entered the First World War in 1917, many young men in Spokane rushed to join the Army and lend their part to the war effort. Three farm boys from Moran Prairie, Walter, Charles, and Ralph Burch, joined the Army but had very…

American involvement in the First World War was at first unpopular--and nowhere more than Spokane. As the great powers of Europe stumbled into conflict in 1914, few Spokanites saw it as their fight. Though they did have opinions. The strong…

John Doran opened his business in 1914 just as automobiles were remaking American society. He sold such early models as the Essex, the Packard, and the Hudson. The Hudson had a more powerful engine at a cheaper price than competitors such as Ford's…

The sands of time are running low for the massive concrete Clock Tower that stands at the entrance of the Spokane Community College. The Washington State Department of Transportation has been trying to find a way to remedy ongoing traffic issues, and…

On the evening of January 17th, 1914, F. Lewis Clark and his wife arrived at the train station in Santa Barbara, California. Rather than joining his wife, Clark helped her board the train and left her with a kiss. Telling his chauffeur to meet him in…

After the close of World War II, world power relations shifted. A global clash with USSR had Americans uneasy, particularly after the Soviets developed nuclear weaponry in 1949. In response to global Soviet aggression, Congress approved measures to…

Red Power was a movement for American Indian rights that began in the 1960s. Nationally, the American Indian Movement (AIM) led a series of national actions and protests, including the storming of the BIA building in Washington D.C., the occupation…

With unemployment during the Great Depression reaching nearly 25% in Spokane, thousands of young men in the Inland Northwest joined the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Earning $30 per month, they obtained an education and vocational training while…

Born at the end of December 1918 in Spokane, Eleanor Barrow Chase was the third-generation of her family to live in the growing city. She attended Lewis and Clark High School and Washington State College. She graduated magna cum laude from Whitworth…

Born in 1914 to a working-class African American family in dusty Wharton, Texas, James E. Chase might not have seemed like a future mayor. The youngest of seven, money was right in his family, although his childhood job at a bakery did pay in…

The pioneers of early Spokane did not live on bread alone. The rough frontier boomtown of the 1880s hosted luxury businesses as well, including Dodson's Jewelers. George Dodson arrived in Spokan Falls in 1888 after his long journey from Illinois.…

The world’s largest Radio Flyer wagon “The Childhood Express” sits in Spokane’s Riverfront Park. It was commissioned by the Junior League of Spokane for the State centennial Celebration of Children in 1989. The plaque reads: “This Sculpture is…

In the 1920s, Ernest James Brown (E.J. for short) settled in Spokane with his wife Myrtle (known as Theo). After opening a successful restaurant in 1927 called the Sawdust Trail on Sprague Avenue and Havana Street, E.J. and his wife embarked on a new…

The year is 1973 and upon a shelf in a local bookstore you come across The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan. You have just taken your first step into the world of Second Wave Feminism. The 1960s were a turbulent time and here in Spokane. Marion…

It was a typical winter morning on December 18, 1915, as two streetcars began to cross the Spokane river via the Division Street bridge. When the cars met on the middle of the bridge, steel girders ripped from the bank. One streetcar hung up on the…

One of Carl Maxey's earliest memories of fighting was against racism during his childhood. Maxey was adopted and then orphaned and ended up at the Spokane Children's Home in 1933. Maxey remembered that when the orphans took a trip to Camp Cowles, he…

In 1960, Fairchild Air Force Base’s 567th Strategic Missile Squadron went live with their Atlas E Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (IBM) sites. Each Atlas E was outfitted with a 4-megaton nuclear warhead. Site 6 is located near the small farming…

On April 3rd, 1922, Commissioner Gifford, the territorial commander of the Salvation Army, addressed hundreds of Spokane citizens who attended the dedication ceremony of the new headquarters at 245 W. Main. “The doors to this building shall always be…

On a rainy spring morning in Spokane, the wailing cries of air raid sirens rang across downtown. Operation Walkout had begun, as thousands of employees and residents evacuated the downtown district on foot. They gathered at points where busses were…

Founded by members of the American Indian Movement (AIM) on June 12, 1967, Spokane’s American Indian Community Center was formed in response to the social and economic turbulence experienced by Indigenous peoples. As more Natives left the…

Although it is commonly known as “The Loop”, the green space that is considered the centerpiece of Whitworth's campus is in fact rectangular. From an aerial view, it is obvious that this part of campus is a natural landscape of pine trees and grassy…

The post-World War II decades were good ones for Whitworth College, which saw great expansion and growth. In particular, student enrollment vastly increased, due to the GI Bill and a greater sense of optimism, freedom, and prosperity. To serve…