In the house that once sat on this corner of 1st and Hemlock lived Robert E Strahorn. Few men can be said to have as much influence developing the west as Strahorn. Throughout the 1870s and 80s, he traveled across the Pacific Northwest as the…

When the United States entered the First World War in 1917, many young men in Spokane rushed to join the Army and lend their part to the war effort. Three farm boys from Moran Prairie, Walter, Charles, and Ralph Burch, joined the Army but had very…

The sands of time are running low for the massive concrete Clock Tower that stands at the entrance of the Spokane Community College. The Washington State Department of Transportation has been trying to find a way to remedy ongoing traffic issues, and…

On the evening of January 17th, 1914, F. Lewis Clark and his wife arrived at the train station in Santa Barbara, California. Rather than joining his wife, Clark helped her board the train and left her with a kiss. Telling his chauffeur to meet him in…

Red Power was a movement for American Indian rights that began in the 1960s. Nationally, the American Indian Movement (AIM) led a series of national actions and protests, including the storming of the BIA building in Washington D.C., the occupation…

With unemployment during the Great Depression reaching nearly 25% in Spokane, thousands of young men in the Inland Northwest joined the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Earning $30 per month, they obtained an education and vocational training while…

Born at the end of December 1918 in Spokane, Eleanor Barrow Chase was the third-generation of her family to live in the growing city. She attended Lewis and Clark High School and Washington State College. She graduated magna cum laude from Whitworth…

The pioneers of early Spokane did not live on bread alone. The rough frontier boomtown of the 1880s hosted luxury businesses as well, including Dodson's Jewelers. George Dodson arrived in Spokan Falls in 1888 after his long journey from Illinois.…

The world’s largest Radio Flyer wagon “The Childhood Express” sits in Spokane’s Riverfront Park. It was commissioned by the Junior League of Spokane for the State centennial Celebration of Children in 1989. The plaque reads: “This Sculpture is…

The year is 1973 and upon a shelf in a local bookstore you come across The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan. You have just taken your first step into the world of Second Wave Feminism. The 1960s were a turbulent time and here in Spokane. Marion…

It was a typical winter morning on December 18, 1915, as two streetcars began to cross the Spokane river via the Division Street bridge. When the cars met on the middle of the bridge, steel girders ripped from the bank. One streetcar hung up on the…

One of Carl Maxey's earliest memories of fighting was against racism during his childhood. Maxey was adopted and then orphaned and ended up at the Spokane Children's Home in 1933. Maxey remembered that when the orphans took a trip to Camp Cowles, he…

Although it is commonly known as “The Loop”, the green space that is considered the centerpiece of Whitworth's campus is in fact rectangular. From an aerial view, it is obvious that this part of campus is a natural landscape of pine trees and grassy…

The post-World War II decades were good ones for Whitworth College, which saw great expansion and growth. In particular, student enrollment vastly increased, due to the GI Bill and a greater sense of optimism, freedom, and prosperity. To serve…

Built in 1984, the Aquatic Center is home to Whitworth's men's and women's swimming teams. The pool consists of six lanes that are forty yards long. The pool has been the host to the 1986 NAIA championship,as well as the Northwest Conference…

On the backside of Whitworth University's pine tree covered campus one can find beautiful Merkel Field, home of the Whitworth University baseball team. Merkel Field is named in honor of former head coach, Paul Merkel who coached from 1956-1971 and…

Oliver Hall is one of the newest additions to the Whitworth campus.. Construction began in the winter of 2008, and the residence hall was opened in the fall of 2009, costing a total of $11.6 million. Upon its opening, the building was named East (…

Music filled the halls of the new Whitworth Music Building on February 26th, 1978. At the dedication, then-President Edward Lindaman, Music Professor Dr. Richard Evans, and many others spoke on behalf of the Whitworth community to celebrate the…

On the spot currently occupied by Weyerhaeuser Hall once stood the Whitworth Dining Hall, which was later named Leavitt Hall. Originally built in 1944 due to the growing student body. Leavitt Hall became the gathering place for all students who…

Throughout the years, the Lindaman Center has served many purposes at Whitworth University. The building was originally the Music and Arts building and was part of the 1946 Mead Act, which provided Whitworth, as well as several other schools in the…

The second phase of the Hixson Union Building, known as the HUB, was completed on October 23, 1998 where it was declared finished by Whitworth’s president, Bill Robinson. The HUB's predecessor existed on the same location from 1957 until 1994. It…